Millionaire Mentor: George Ross, Trump Organisation, The Apprentice Judge

How To Transition from Law To Business

So I had the pleasure of interviewing George Ross, Donald Trump’s Right Hand Man and Chief Legal Counsel of the Trump Organisation (for 42 years!).

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He was also a judge on The Apprentice and Celebrity Apprentice. Yeah, he’s the guy on the left.

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I can’t imagine how much experience he has, but I thought I’d take the chance to find out his thoughts on transitioning from law to business.

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To all my lawyer friends, don’t say don’t have!

To be honest, he doesn’t say anything groundbreaking, but it’s good to know you’re on the right track if you’re doing what he says you should since he’s done it before.

First steps to transitioning from law to business

Overcoming the fear or apprehension in transitioning from law to business

 

 

 

LAWGICALLY SPEAKING: PUNCTUALITY

The Importance of Being On Time.

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Be On Time!

If you’re in  Singapore, you’ve probably already read about the High Court Judge who dismissed 4 applications to partly call 4 Practice Trainees to the Singapore Bar because their supervising lawyers were late.

This is the same judge who admitted me to the Singapore Bar.

For those who are not familiar with the legal industry in Singapore, Practice Trainees are trainee lawyers and to become a full fledged Advocate & Solicitor, your supervising lawyer will need to move your call in court i.e. they basically are the ones who tell the Court you’re ready to become a lawyer because you’ve completed the necessary training.

However, this instance was a part call, which allows these Practice Trainees a limited audience before the courts before being fully qualified for the  Bar.

For a judge to dismiss these applications to shame the supervising lawyers actually means the Practice Trainees will have to do all the paperwork to apply, again. And whatever responsibilities that were initially intended for them to take over after the part call would have to wait.

The supervising lawyers actually don’t have to do anything much but show up on time in Court. But I suppose the punishment is in making them give up their time, again. And of course, because of this newspaper article, shame them, publicly.

It’s actually not uncommon for lawyers to be late for Court because of scheduling conflicts. But I suppose the Court’s stance is that’s not a good excuse, which is also true.

Well, hang in there, TheUnfortunateFour Practice Trainees. The part call will roll around soon enough.

Read the article here.