5 Things I Learned from Randi Zuckerberg

Supermamapreneur Sighting

Randi Zuckerberg is the Founder and CEO of Zuckerberg Media, Creator of Dot Complicated and Former Director of Market Development & Spokesperson of Facebook.

Randi was not at all how I imagined her to be when I met her.

I half expected a professional, hardened, power-talking persona, and maybe she would be a little cold and standoffish, but she was none of those things.

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She’s got to be one of my favourite Supermamapreneurs because she is so down-to-earth and warm. She’s smart and immensely funny, and she doesn’t possess that arrogance that some super successful people have.

Here’s 5 things that I’ve learnt from her:

Lesson 1: Don’t let your height get to your head, and negativity get to your heart

When Mark first started Facebook, he was just 18 years old and people were mean and called him the toddler CEO. Even though he does have a thick skin, (and I guess you would have to develop that if you’re him), sometimes it was hard to not let comments like this get to him. Someone passed some advice to Randi, which she shared with him – You’re never as bad as they say, and never as good as they say, so don’t let your height get to your head, and negativity get to your heart.

Lesson 2: Her Secret to being a Supermamapreneur — Work, Sleep, Fitness, Family, Friends – Pick 3 Only 

To juggle her life and make it work, she gives herself permission to not have to do everything all at once. Each day, just pick 3, and everyday can be different. See, this is actually the secret of being super – we don’t have to try to do everything at once, and I think we have to learn to stop pressuring ourselves to be everything to everyone too. It’s just not sustainable.

Lesson 3: It doesn’t matter if you get 4000 “Nos”. You just need 1 “YES!” 

In 2007,  she wanted to give Facebook some credibility by getting involved in the U.S. Presidential campaigns, and to show that Facebook is also a serious place for discourse. She called so many campaigns and got turned down many, many times. The only one who said “yes” from the start was the Obama campaign (and look how that turned out!).

Lesson 4: Don’t go into business with your best friend.

If you’re best friends, chances are you both are quite alike. Having differences is the only reason why she and Mark could work together so well for so long. They would work on different areas of the business and not step on each others toes. So in business, pick someone opposite of you for best results.

Lesson 5: Money just amplifies what’s already in you. 

When asked how money has changed her life, she says she still lives a very simple life, and lives the way she did before. In her experience, money doesn’t change people. It just amplifies what is already inside of you. So if you are insecure, money will make you crazy insecure. If you’re an asshole, money will make you a crazy asshole!

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Love her yet? 🙂

Millionaire Mentor: George Ross, Trump Organisation, The Apprentice Judge

How To Transition from Law To Business

So I had the pleasure of interviewing George Ross, Donald Trump’s Right Hand Man and Chief Legal Counsel of the Trump Organisation (for 42 years!).

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He was also a judge on The Apprentice and Celebrity Apprentice. Yeah, he’s the guy on the left.

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I can’t imagine how much experience he has, but I thought I’d take the chance to find out his thoughts on transitioning from law to business.

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To all my lawyer friends, don’t say don’t have!

To be honest, he doesn’t say anything groundbreaking, but it’s good to know you’re on the right track if you’re doing what he says you should since he’s done it before.

First steps to transitioning from law to business

Overcoming the fear or apprehension in transitioning from law to business

 

 

 

Expired Food Art

I was clearing out my supplies and found all this expired flour that I couldn’t bring myself to just throw away.

So I decided to make play dough with it with the kids. Just add water and salt and mix through to the right consistency. The salt is just there to make the dough stretchy so don’t go adding too much. 2 tablespoons to 1kg of flour is more than enough.

My mum used to make this play dough at home when I was a kid and I always wondered why we didn’t add any food colouring. Well now I do! Getting the colour to mix through the dough to get a consistent shade throughout is really tiring work. But I suppose great catharsis if you want to destress.

I call the patchy blue one cookie monster cookie dough – but now I realise it sounds like I’ve made cookie dough out of cookie monster  

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